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For the most complete and up-to-date information, consult your local election official.

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Voters can choose to skip contests on their ballot and still cast a valid vote. →

The Facts:

Voting for only a single contest, or skipping some contests, is a valid way to vote. Ballots with selections for only certain races happen every election and are counted. This way of voting, sometimes called “undervoting,” most commonly occurs when voters vote only for the highest office on the ballot, in this case, president.

Election safeguards make it impossible to have more ballots than registered voters. Claims that say otherwise are false. →

The Facts:

It is impossible for a state to count more votes than there are eligible voters. Charts showing otherwise are attempting to mislead the public by displaying fabricated figures. Election officials have robust procedures in place to ensure that every voter only gets a single vote in an election. And as a final check, election results are certified by someone other than the election officials to provide assurance that the results are correct.

Remaining votes in Allegheny County will be counted on Friday as dictated by Election Code requirements. →

The Facts:

Allegheny County, PA has over 35,000 outstanding mail ballots that won’t be counted until Friday. These ballots require extra scrutiny, so must be handled by members of a special return board, who will be sworn in tomorrow (11/6), as stipulated by the state election code.

Clark County - like every jurisdiction - has safeguards to ensure eligible voters get only one vote. →

The Facts:

States have voter registration safeguards to ensure that only eligible citizens are registered to vote. In addition, mailed ballots are designed with numerous security features, such as personalized barcodes, to guarantee that only one ballot is cast per person. In Clark County, NV, fewer than 800,000 out of the 1.45 million registered voters cast a ballot in this election, based on current counts. Claims that exaggerate these figures are false.

Felt-tipped pens can be used to fill out ballots without invalidating them. →

The Facts:

Election officials in Pennsylvania and Arizona have guaranteed that ballots will be counted regardless of the type of pen used to indicate the vote. Election officials note that ballot scanners can read ballots filled out with sharpie even with bleed through. In the case that ballots cannot be processed by the scan machine due to a bleed over mark from a marker, a duplicate ballot will be made and counted.

Only around 200 ballots need to be cured in DeKalb County, not the much larger number being circulated on social media. →

The Facts:

According to election officials in DeKalb County, GA, only about 200 ballots -  0.2% of the total number of absentee ballots returned in the county - have been rejected and need to be cured. This number is a fraction of the much larger figure being incorrectly circulated on social media. 

In Wisconsin, and in every state, there are never more ballots than registered voters. →

The Facts:

The number of ballots cast in Wisconsin - and in every state - is by law less than or equal to the total number of registered voters in the state. In Wisconsin, “there are never more ballots than registered voters,” according to the Wisconsin Elections Commission. Because Wisconsin allows voters to register on Election Day, sometimes the new number of registered voters takes time to be updated. This delay has led to some false conclusions.

The USPS’s “extraordinary measures” to expedite the delivery of mail ballots led to some confusion.  →

The Facts:

The USPS took “extraordinary measures” to expedite the delivery of mail ballots. But some analysis of their service delivery data has led to conclusions that are misleading or wrong. The USPS reports that the scanning data that has been shared has “little to no analytical value.” This is an ongoing story.

No one knows who won the presidential race yet since votes are still being counted. →

The Facts:

As of November 4th, states are actively processing and counting ballots. Any claims of victory in the presidential election are not accurate. In modern elections, no state reports certified election results on Election Day. Provisional ballots, military ballots from overseas, and ballots that are accepted with an Election Day postmark can be counted days after voting ends.

Each state has laws governing “electioneering” or the types of voter persuasion activities allowed at or near polling places. →

The Facts:

States’ “electioneering” laws govern acceptable activities allowed near polling places and the types of visual symbols and apparel that can be displayed there. An earlier incident in Pennsylvania mischaracterized campaign signs as illegal electioneering. However, a prompt investigation revealed they met Pennsylvania’s 10-foot electioneering restrictions.

Georgia voters who have an unreturned absentee ballot can still vote in person, even if they don't bring their absentee ballot with them. →

The Facts:

Voters across multiple counties in Georgia have reported being told incorrectly that they must have their absentee ballots with them in order to cancel them and vote in person. While procedures vary by jurisdiction, in all states except Kentucky, voters who have received a mail ballot can still vote in person as long as they have not already returned their mail ballot. 

Pennsylvania ballots postmarked on Election Day should be counted, according to official guidance. →

The Facts:

Current guidance from Pennsylvania officials dictates that ballots postmarked on Election Day that arrive by 5pm on November 6 should be counted. The Pennsylvania Department of State has authorized counties to proceed with canvassing and counting of these ballots, but also ordered the ballots be segregated in the event of a rule change.

November 3rd is the last day to vote. Robocalls that say otherwise are attempts to suppress the vote. →

The Facts:

Robocalls to voters in Michigan, North Carolina, and other states are spreading false election information and should not be trusted. Election officials are the best sources for polling place information, state and local regulations, and ongoing events. If you receive a suspicious call, it’s best to verify the information directly with your officials. You can use the Voting Information Tool on this site to find their contact information.

Election observers are often allowed at polling places, but are always prohibited from intimidating voters. →

The Facts:

State and local laws regulate who is permitted to observe the polls and what they are permitted to do. Poll watchers must follow these established rules and are prohibited from interfering in the electoral process. Voter harassment or intimidation, by observers or anyone else, is illegal. 

Ohio’s Franklin County is switching to paper poll books to check in voters. →

The Facts:

Election officials in Franklin County will be using paper poll books instead of an electronic system to check in voters at polling locations today. Fortunately, the county is prepared for this contingency since the state requires that officials have a paper poll book to back up each electronic version. While this may cause some delays, voters should feel confident that they can vote as planned.

Ballots received after Election Day are legally valid in many states and will be counted. →

The Facts:

Many states will accept and count ballots postmarked by Election Day, even if they are received after November 3rd. While some states extended the deadline for ballot receipt in response to the pandemic, there is a long history of states accepting postmarked ballots. This is especially true for overseas and military voters, who may have an even longer window to return their ballots than domestic voters in some jurisdictions.

We may not know who won the presidential race on November 3rd, and that’s normal. →

The Facts:

In modern elections, no state reports certified election results on Election Day. Provisional ballots, military ballots from overseas, and ballots that are accepted with an Election Day postmark can be counted days after voting ends. State laws give election officials weeks to finalize results to ensure ALL votes are completely and accurately counted. News outlets may call winners in advance of certified results, but those are based on projections using statistical models and partial counts. 

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